Z for Zachariah Quick Summary

Quick Summary
Z for Zachariah is a gripping, thought-provoking story about life after a nuclear holocaust, by a Newbery Medalist. This Robert O’Brien novel takes the form of the diary of a girl who survives a nuclear holocaust. She finds herself alone on a remote farm, until a stranger arrives. The Card Catalog of your library will tell you that "Seemingly the only person left alive after a nuclear war, a sixteen-year-old girl is relieved to see a man arrive into her valley until she realizes that he is a tyrant and she must somehow escape." Read more in depth reviews of Z for Zachariah here You can buy this book online with the links below.

Where to Get it
This book is published by Chalkface Press And can be purchased online through Amazon Books
                             


More About Robert C. O'Brien
To find out more about Robert C. O'Brien you can read the following:
Robert C O'Brien By Sally M. Obrien.
Robert C O'Brien By The Book of Junior A&I
Collected Obituaries



People's Reactions
rusbaoom@usaor.net from Wexford, Pa , rating=10:
Z for Zachariah is the best book I have ever read! Z for Zachariah is written so well, you could just as easily be there, experiencing the story right alongside with the heroine (Ann). O'Brien wrote this piece in such a manner that once you pick it up, it is simply impossible to put it down. This is definitely the book to curl up with on a cold winter day!

stormwindz@hotmail.com from Sweden, rating=10:
Z for Zachariah is a must for all science fiction lovers I've read this book countless times. It's definitely one of the best 'end of the human race' books in existence. This book makes you feel as if you're there. It's written in the form of the diary of the last (?) female on earth, and tells about how she handles her predicament.

nailpolix@hotmail.com, rating=9:
A radiated world filled with one clean valley. The author clearly states what life would be like thinking your the last person on earth. Thinking your all alone and wondering how much longer will I be able to survive? Then one day there's smoke. Watching, wondering what's happening? You see a stranger in a green suit. A stranger who withstanded all the radiation in the world. Then lets say the stranger took off his suit and seeing your valley, free of radiation, swims in the one radiated river? Do you help? As you help the stranger has nightmares, remembering when there was only one suit and two people. Remembering how he shot the other man with the suit, patched it and traveled across the world. What do you do? Do you run, do you take the suit? What would you do?

nailpolix@hotmail.com, rating=8:
This book is suitable for readers from young adults on up. This book is one that you will not regret reading. I found that once I picked it up I couldn't put it down. I read it in high school and again in an adolescent literature class at the University of Central Florida. I was excited to read it again. The strength that is shown by Ann, the heroine, is unreal. I recommend this book for everyone! Michael P. Novello

dgross@s054.aone.net.au, rating=9:
This book changed my outlook on life as a whole... This vivid recount of the life of a woman, the last one on earth, is very moving and should be read by anyone interested in nuclear holocausts.

world@teleport.com, rating=7:
Thought provoking. I remember reading this story in high-school years ago, and I found it again at the used bookstore. I found it more thought provoking and touching when I reread it as an adult. I am still amazed at the strength of the heroine. The story holds up even after twenty years, and would entertain young adult readers today. Kelly Macsisak

tje3@columbia.edu, rating=5:
interesting It's been a long time since I read this but I recall that I read it through in one sitting because it got my interest.




1997 Boris Masis borisma@mediaone.net


About Robert C'Obrien and Z for Zachariah,
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